Zuckerberg wants to revive Facebook's reputation: this is how he intends to bring the Internet to all corners of the world

The company has installed floating beacons to distribute electricity to repeaters on submarine cables. Facebook Connectivity
The company has installed floating beacons to distribute electricity to repeaters on submarine cables. Facebook Connectivity

Facebook is working on bringing the Internet to parts of the world where fiber currently does not reach. According to the company announcement, its plans include submarine cables, an installer robot that moves along power lines, and a wireless system that uses street furniture to give high speed.

The company will carry out these projects through Facebook Connectivity, its company that has already offered a fast and secure connection to more than 300 million people. Through it, they plan to equip 1 billion more people with the Internet for the next decade.


Facebook Connectivity has been developing different solutions for bringing high-speed Internet over land, air, and sea for a few years. This has been communicated by Portaltic de Europa Press, which has attended a press conference of the company.


In addition, the company has announced a transatlantic submarine cabling system that will link Europe with the United States with 24 fiber pairs. To date, the vast majority of transoceanic submarine cables were between 2 to 8 fiber pairs.


With this new system, Portaltic reports that "the capacity of transatlantic cables from the beginning of the century is multiplied by 200". This means that submarine cables with 24 fiber pairs offer a capacity of half a petabit per second (half a million gigabits).


The 2Africa project

Another of the plans that Facebook Connectivity has in mind is to connect Africa, Asia, and Europe with a new aluminum conductor system with which they want to replace the current copper conductors. In this way, they plan to reduce the construction costs of their cables.

The company works to connect Europe, Asia and Africa with submarine cables.
The company works to connect Europe, Asia, and Africa with submarine cables.

On the other hand, the company's developers have created floating beacons to distribute electricity to the repeaters from the water. This method will help to solve the problem of manufacturing very long electrical cables.


Likewise, Portaltic ensures that they have also combined the action of wave energy converters (from waves) and solar panels to offer 10 times more capacity.


An alternative to fiber on land

Facebook has stated that the manufacture of a meter of fiber currently costs only a few cents, but its complete installation costs tens and hundreds of euros. To reduce costs, the company is working on a robot that they have called Bombyx.

Bombyx is a robot that installs fiber in power lines.Facebook Connectivity
Bombyx is a robot that installs fiber in power lines. Facebook Connectivity

This machine is capable of moving through medium voltage power lines and laying fiber cables. Thus, Facebook Connectivity will avoid digging and deploying the fiber underground.


Bombyx weighs 4.5 kilograms and thanks to its stabilization system it can climb vertically on a power line and cross it in 4 minutes. In fact, this robot can turn around and maintain balance despite obstacles to wind the fiber on power lines.


On the other hand, Facebook Connectivity has manufactured fiber cables that are less heavy and with better resistance to high temperatures so that they can withstand their installation to medium voltage cables.


Air connection through street furniture

The company will also begin using a technology they have called Terragraph to take advantage of transmitters installed on rooftops and street furniture and create a distributed network of fast and reliable connectivity.

The company will create a wireless connection in some municipalities.Facebook Connectivity
The company will create a wireless connection in some municipalities. Facebook Connectivity

This connection has already been deployed in Anchorage (Alaska) and Perth (Australia) and offers equivalent characteristics to fiber without resorting to cables.

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